Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission

Agenda – Design Review

The May 27 meeting of the Design Review Committee will be a virtual meeting. Please note there will be no accommodation for any in-person attendance.  If you need special accommodations, please contact the HLC office at 980-314-7660.

Instructions and Access to Design Review Committee Virtual Meeting


May 27, 2020 – 8:00 a.m.

1.  Chair’s Report: Garrett Nelson

2.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

3.   James A. Blakeney House, 9118 Blakeney Heath Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Blakeney House

Blakeney Land

Polaris Map of Property

Original Designated Areas

This Rezoning Sketch Plan was presented to the Design Review Committee at its January 2020 meeting.

Current Rezoning Sketch Plan

Proposal Details

Photographs of Structures on Property

The applicant is presenting a conceptual plan for residential development of the property. The applicant intends to demolish and remove the three outbuildings on the property due to their location and does not believe they are salvageable.

 

4.  Independence Park, 300 block of Hawthorne Lane, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Renovation Plan

Demolition, Layout, and Materials Plans

The proposed park renovation is extensive and will affect much of the park land including the areas of the park both to the east and to the west of the 300 block of Hawthorne Lane. The park is composed of Mecklenburg County tax parcels 08019201 and 12703416.

5.  John Hunter House, 5607 Sardis Road, Charlotte, N.C.

John Hunter House

Polaris Map of Property

Proposed Plans

The applicant is proposing renovations and additions to the house and site.

6.  Violet W. Currie House, 525 N. Main Street, Davidson, N.C.

Violet W. Currie House

Polaris Map of Property

Proposed Plans

The applicant is proposing to build a guest house on the property.

7.  Reginald Armistice Hawkins House, 1703 Madison Avenue, Charlotte, N.C.

Reginald Armistice Hawkins House

Polaris Map of Property

WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED.

8.  Old Business

9.  New Business


February 26, 2020 – 8:00 a.m.

1.  Chair’s Report: Garrett Nelson

2.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

3.  Atherton Cotton Mill, 2108 South Boulevard, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Additional Photographs of the Smokestack

Proposed Plans

The applicant is seeking approval for signage attached to the historic smokestack.

Atherton Cotton Mill

Atherton Cotton Mill Smokestack

4.  Mayes House, 435 E. Morehead Street, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

The applicant is applying for a COA for Demolition for the property.  The owner is also exploring preservation options for the property. 

John Mayes House

5.  Independence Park, 1400 and 1500 blocks of Park Drive, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Proposed Plans

Independence Park Renovation Plan

The applicant is proposing to add concrete paving around an existing ball field and to modify an existing historic stone wall.

Independence Park Grandstand

6.  Violet W. Currie House, 525 N. Main Street, Davidson, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Proposed Plans

Previously Approved Plans

The applicant is proposing to modify the approved plans for an addition to the rear of the house.

Violet W. Currie House

7.  Charles E. Barnhardt House, 3217 Maymont Place, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Proposed Plans

Previously Approved Plans

The applicant is proposing a revision to an approved plan which increases the size of an addition on the south elevation of the house.

Charles E. Barnhardt House

8.  Old Business

9.  New Business


The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation is defined as the act or process of making possible a compatible use for a property through repair, alterations, and additions while preserving those portions or features which convey its historical, cultural, or architectural values.

1. A property will be used as it was historically or be given a new use that requires minimal change to its distinctive materials, features, spaces and spatial relationships.

2. The historic character of a property will be retained and preserved. The removal of distinctive materials or alteration of features, spaces and spatial relationships that characterize a property will be avoided.

3. Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or elements from other historic properties, will not be undertaken.

4. Changes to a property that have acquired historic significance in their own right will be retained and preserved.

5. Distinctive materials, features, finishes and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property will be preserved.

6. Deteriorated historic features will be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature will match the old in design, color, texture and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features will be substantiated by documentary and physical evidence.

7. Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.

8. Archaeological resources will be protected and preserved in place. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken.

9. New additions, exterior alterations or related new construction will not destroy historic materials, features and spatial relationships that characterize the property. The new work will be differentiated from the old and will be compatible with the historic materials, features, size, scale and proportion, and massing to protect the integrity of the property and its environment.

10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction will be undertaken in such a manner that, if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.


January 29, 2020 – 8:00 a.m.

1.  Chair’s Report: Garrett Nelson

2.  Director’s Report: Jack Thomson

3.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

4.  Hennigan Place, 3603 Tilley Morris Road, Matthews, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Proposed Floor Plan

Additional Photographs of the Property

The applicant is proposing modifications to the house’s existing historic stone foundation.

Applicant’s reasons for this request:

1. While bringing the home up to industry standards for the HVAC system, a new unit was installed in the ceiling to handle the second floor and a second unit was placed in the crawl space to efficiently heat and cool the entire first floor. By placing the one unit in the crawl, it eliminated the need for chases to carry the air floor back to the ceiling. Building code requires the unit to be protected from the outside elements.

2. Enclosing the crawl will allow for better insulation underneath the house to help with heating and cooling.

3. By enclosing the crawl, this will reduce the chance of water intrusion underneath the original home and keep the moisture content at a standard level. You can see signs of damage from the one picture of the original hardwood floors.

4. Enclosing the crawl will keep unwanted guests from taking shelter or nesting under the home.

Hennigan Place

Hennigan Place

5.  Blakeney House, 9118 Blakeney Heath Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Proposed Site Plan

The applicant is seeking approval of an infill development plan.

Blakeney House

Blakeney Land

6.  Frank R. McNinch House, 2401 Sharon Lane, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Proposed Site Plan

The applicant is seeking approval of an infill development plan.

McNinch House

McNinch House

7.  Old Business

8.  New Business


The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation is defined as the act or process of making possible a compatible use for a property through repair, alterations, and additions while preserving those portions or features which convey its historical, cultural, or architectural values.

1. A property will be used as it was historically or be given a new use that requires minimal change to its distinctive materials, features, spaces and spatial relationships.

2. The historic character of a property will be retained and preserved. The removal of distinctive materials or alteration of features, spaces and spatial relationships that characterize a property will be avoided.

3. Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or elements from other historic properties, will not be undertaken.

4. Changes to a property that have acquired historic significance in their own right will be retained and preserved.

5. Distinctive materials, features, finishes and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property will be preserved.

6. Deteriorated historic features will be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature will match the old in design, color, texture and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features will be substantiated by documentary and physical evidence.

7. Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.

8. Archaeological resources will be protected and preserved in place. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken.

9. New additions, exterior alterations or related new construction will not destroy historic materials, features and spatial relationships that characterize the property. The new work will be differentiated from the old and will be compatible with the historic materials, features, size, scale and proportion, and massing to protect the integrity of the property and its environment.

10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction will be undertaken in such a manner that, if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.


November 20, 2019 – 8:00 a.m.

1.  Chair’s Report: Garrett Nelson

2.  Director’s Report: Dan Morrill

3.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

4.  Frank R. McNinch House, 2401 Sharon Lane, Charlotte, N.C.

The applicant is seeking conceptual approval of an infill development plan. 

McNinch House

McNinch House

*See Video on the Property Below

Proposed Plans

Street View of the Property

Polaris Map of the Property

5.  Johnston Building, 212 S. Tryon Street, Charlotte, N.C.

The applicant is applying for a Certificate of Appropriateness for proposed interior alterations to the lobby area.

Proposed Plans

6.  Charles E. Barnhardt House, 3217 Maymont Place, Charlotte, N.C.

The applicant is proposing to revise the approved rehabilitation plan to include a garage on the rear addition.

Charles E. Barnhardt House

Charles E. Barnhardt House

Previously Approved Plans

Proposed Plans

Additional Photographs

Street View of the Property

Polaris Map of the Property

7.  Old Business

8.  New Business


The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation is defined as the act or process of making possible a compatible use for a property through repair, alterations, and additions while preserving those portions or features which convey its historical, cultural, or architectural values.

1. A property will be used as it was historically or be given a new use that requires minimal change to its distinctive materials, features, spaces and spatial relationships.

2. The historic character of a property will be retained and preserved. The removal of distinctive materials or alteration of features, spaces and spatial relationships that characterize a property will be avoided.

3. Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or elements from other historic properties, will not be undertaken.

4. Changes to a property that have acquired historic significance in their own right will be retained and preserved.

5. Distinctive materials, features, finishes and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property will be preserved.

6. Deteriorated historic features will be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature will match the old in design, color, texture and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features will be substantiated by documentary and physical evidence.

7. Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.

8. Archaeological resources will be protected and preserved in place. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken.

9. New additions, exterior alterations or related new construction will not destroy historic materials, features and spatial relationships that characterize the property. The new work will be differentiated from the old and will be compatible with the historic materials, features, size, scale and proportion, and massing to protect the integrity of the property and its environment.

10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction will be undertaken in such a manner that, if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.


Frank R. McNinch House, 2401 Sharon Lane, Charlotte, N.C.

 


October 30, 2019 – 8:00 a.m. 

1.  Chair’s Report: Garrett Nelson

2.  Director’s Report: Dan Morrill

3.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

4.  Charles E. Barnhardt House, 3217 Maymont Place, Charlotte, N.C.

Charles E. Barnhardt House

Charles E. Barnhardt House

In August 2019 the HLC approved the following motion giving the owner approval of a Conceptual Plan.

MS. ALTHOUSE PRESENTED A MOTION SECONDED BY MR. BERRY THAT THE HISTORIC LANDMARKS COMMISSION CONCEPTUALLY APPROVE THE FOLLOWING AT THE CHARLES E. BARNHARDT HOUSE, 3217 MAYMONT PLACE, CHARLOTTE, N.C., WITH THE STIPULATION THAT FINAL ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS WILL BE PRESENTED TO THE DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE FOR APPROVAL: A TALL ADDITION ON THE REAR OF THE HOUSE OF THE GENERAL DIMENSIONS SHOWN ON THE PRESENTED PLANS, A SWIMMING POOL BE ALLOWED TO BE CONSTRUCTED ON THE REAR TERRACE, THE CONCEPTUAL INTERIOR ALTERATIONS AS SHOWN ON THE PRESENTED PLANS, AND THE REPLACEMENT OF THE GLASS BLOCK WINDOW AT THE STAIRWELL WITH A CLEAR-GLASS WINDOW OF THE SAME DESIGN. THE COMMISSION UNANIMOUSLY APPROVED THE MOTION.

Proposed Plans for the House

Specification and Material Selections

Additional Photographs

The applicant is proposing a renovation of the house. 

5.  Edgewood Farm, 11132 Eastfield Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Edgewood Farm

Site Plan

Site Plan with Survey

Additional Photographs

Street View I

Street View II

Street View III

The applicant is seeking conceptual approval of an infill development plan. 

6.  Delburg Cotton Mill House, 303 Delburg Street, Davidson, N.C.

Delburg Cotton Mill House

Additional Photographs

The applicant is requesting a revision to the approved plan for the chimney.

7.  Davidson Cotton Mill, 209 Delburg Street, Davidson, N.C.

Davidson Cotton Mill

Davidson Cotton Mill

Proposed Plans for the Elevator Tower Addition

Proposed Plan and Existing

The applicant is proposing the addition of an elevator tower and a covered parking structure. 

8.  Old Business

9.  New Business