Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission

Author: Elizabeth Stuart


November 20, 2019 – 8:00 a.m.

1.  Chair’s Report: Garrett Nelson

2.  Director’s Report: Dan Morrill

3.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

4.  Frank R. McNinch House, 2401 Sharon Lane, Charlotte, N.C.

The applicant is seeking conceptual approval of an infill development plan. 

McNinch House

McNinch House

*See Video on the Property Below

Proposed Plans

Street View of the Property

Polaris Map of the Property

5.  Johnston Building, 212 S. Tryon Street, Charlotte, N.C.

The applicant is applying for a Certificate of Appropriateness for proposed interior alterations to the lobby area.

Proposed Plans

6.  Charles E. Barnhardt House, 3217 Maymont Place, Charlotte, N.C.

The applicant is proposing to revise the approved rehabilitation plan to include a garage on the rear addition.

Charles E. Barnhardt House

Charles E. Barnhardt House

Previously Approved Plans

Proposed Plans

Additional Photographs

Street View of the Property

Polaris Map of the Property

7.  Old Business

8.  New Business


The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation is defined as the act or process of making possible a compatible use for a property through repair, alterations, and additions while preserving those portions or features which convey its historical, cultural, or architectural values.

1. A property will be used as it was historically or be given a new use that requires minimal change to its distinctive materials, features, spaces and spatial relationships.

2. The historic character of a property will be retained and preserved. The removal of distinctive materials or alteration of features, spaces and spatial relationships that characterize a property will be avoided.

3. Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or elements from other historic properties, will not be undertaken.

4. Changes to a property that have acquired historic significance in their own right will be retained and preserved.

5. Distinctive materials, features, finishes and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property will be preserved.

6. Deteriorated historic features will be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature will match the old in design, color, texture and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features will be substantiated by documentary and physical evidence.

7. Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.

8. Archaeological resources will be protected and preserved in place. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken.

9. New additions, exterior alterations or related new construction will not destroy historic materials, features and spatial relationships that characterize the property. The new work will be differentiated from the old and will be compatible with the historic materials, features, size, scale and proportion, and massing to protect the integrity of the property and its environment.

10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction will be undertaken in such a manner that, if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.


Frank R. McNinch House, 2401 Sharon Lane, Charlotte, N.C.

 


Draft Agenda

1.  Consideration of Minutes  Click Here for November 4th Minutes

2.  Chair’s Report: Jeff Parsons

3.  Director’s Report: Dan Morrill

4.  Treasurer’s Report: Diane Althouse

5.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

6.  Design Review Committee Report: Garrett Nelson

7.  Survey Committee Report: Len Norman

8.  Projects Committee Report: Edwin Wilson  Click Here for Projects Committee Minutes

a.  Wallace House Property, 9425 Robinson Church Road, Charlotte, N.C.

THE PROJECTS COMMITTEE PRESENTS A SECONDED MOTION TO THE HISTORIC LANDMARKS COMMISSION THAT IT EXPLORE ENTERING INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH A DEVELOPER AND INVESTIGATE SUBDIVIDING A PORTION OF THE LAND AROUND THE WALLACE HOUSE, 9425 ROBINSON CHURCH ROAD, CHARLOTTE, N.C., WITH THE UNDERSTANDING THAT THE HOUSE AND A SIGNIFICANT PORTION OF THE LAND CONTIGUOUS AROUND THE HOUSE WILL BE PRESERVED.

b.  Torrence Lytle School, 302 Holbrooks Road, Huntersville, N.C.

THE PROJECTS COMMITTEE PRESENTS A SECONDED MOTION TO THE HISTORIC LANDMARKS COMMISSION THAT IT NOT MOVE FORWARD WITH THE COMMISSION’S PREVIOUS APPROVAL FOR THE DEMOLITION OF ALL BUILDINGS EXCEPT THE ORIGINAL BUILDING AT THE TORRENCE LYTLE SCHOOL, 302 HOLBROOKS ROAD, HUNTERSVILLE, N.C., SO THAT CONSIDERATION OF OTHER OPTIONS CAN OCCUR AFTER DECEMBER 9, 2019, WHEN JACK THOMSON WILL BECOME THE DIRECTOR OF THE CHARLOTTE-MECKLENBURG HISTORIC LANDMARKS COMMISSION.

9.  Old Business

10.  New Business



November 13, 2019 – 6:00 p.m.

1.  Chair’s Report: Len Norman

2.  Director’s Report: Dan Morrill

3.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

4.  Butler House, 240 Sylvania Avenue, Charlotte, N.C.

Butler House

Survey and Research Report

5.  Potential Study List Properties

a.  Simmons House, 625 Hermitage Court, Charlotte, N.C.

Simmons House

Excerpt from Legacy: The Myers Park Story

Images

b.  Ca. 1936 YMCA Building, 317 S. Caldwell Street, Charlotte, N.C.

Image

c.  Pentes Log House, 6510 Sharon Hills Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Map of Property

More Information on the Property

d.  Morris Field Chapel, 5415 Airport Drive, Charlotte, N.C.

Morris Field Chapel

Additional Photographs

e.  Davidson Log House, Eastfield Road, Davidson, N.C.

Davidson Log House

Map of Property

6.  Old Business

7.  New Business

a.  Brian Clarke has provided the following thoughts:

One of the most cutting edge ways being used to identify archaeological sites and resources around the world is LiDAR.  It’s been used to find previously unknown sites in Honduras (the “Lost City of the Monkey God”), Mexico (see https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/08/science/archaeology-lidar-maya.html), the American Southwest, Scotland, Ireland, and many many more. 

I recently discovered that there is a LiDAR scan of all of Mecklenburg County performed in 2017/18 and the data set is publicly available (https://mecklenburgcounty.exavault.com/share/view/1dxv7-b5jh2qyy/Surface%20Data).  A new and interesting survey could likely be extracted from this LiDAR data. For example, focusing just on county owned land (like the various large nature preserves especially those near the Catawba River and/or the areas around known neolithic sites like the Big Rock Rock Shelter or Tuckaseegee Ford) we could commission a survey to identify potential neolithic sites, lost home sites, and such. 

Obviously, we tend to focus primarily on extant buildings.  However, there is much more to Mecklenburg County’s history.  This was an area rich in Native American culture and heritage, given that the capital of the Catawba tribe was just across the river.  Yet Catawba-related sites are few and far between as they’ve mostly been lost to history (the Big Rock Rock Shelter is actually the only one of which I am aware). 

Perhaps there are researchers at UNCC, JCSU, or Queens that would be interested in such a thing to keep the cost of the data analysis reasonable. 

b.  Consideration of Amending the Designation Ordinance for the Victor Shaw House, 2400 Mecklenburg Avenue, Charlotte, N.C.

Conceptual Plan for the Shaw House Property