Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission

Author: Elizabeth Stuart

The June 14 meeting of the Historic Landmarks Commission will be a virtual meeting. Please note there will be no accommodation for any in-person attendance. If you need special accommodations, please contact the HLC office at 980-314-7660.


1.  Consideration of May HLC Minutes

2.  Chair’s Report: Jeff Parsons

3.  Public Comment Period

4.  Treasurer’s Report: Jack Thomson on behalf of Treasurer

5.  Public Hearing for the Following Five Properties: Jeff Parsons

a.  William H. Peeps House, 831 E. Worthington Avenue, Charlotte

Map of Property

Designation Report

SHPO Staff Comments

Designation would include the interior and exterior of the house and the land associated with the tax parcel.

b.  Edgewood Plantation, 11132 Eastfield Road, Charlotte

Site Plan

Amended Designation Report

SHPO Staff Comments

The area of land associated with the landmark in tax parcel numbers 02761104 and 02761105 would be reduced to approximately 2 acres as shown on the site plan.

c.  Ervin Building, 4037 E. Independence Boulevard, Charlotte

Map of Property

Designation Report

SHPO Staff Comments

Designation would include the interior and exterior of the building, and the land listed under Tax Parcel Numbers 13111110 and 13111114.

d.  Larkwood-Chadbourn Hosiery Mill Plant, 451 Jordan Place, Charlotte

Map of Property

Designation Report

SHPO Staff Comments

Designation would include the interior and exterior of the mill building and boiler house, the smokestack, and the land listed under Tax Parcel Number 08306707.

e.  Victor Shaw House, 2400 Mecklenburg Avenue, Charlotte

Site Plan

Amended Designation Report

SHPO Staff Comments

The ordinance designating the Victor Shaw House as a historic landmark would be amended to de-designate all of the land associated with the historic landmark with the exception of the three lots bordering Mecklenburg Avenue, consisting of the lot that contains the historic house and the two adjacent lots lying immediately to the east and west of the historic house. 

6.  Staff recommends that the Commission adopt the following motions to reaffirm its earlier decisions:

a.  To recommend that the Charlotte City Council designate the Larkwood-Chadbourn Hosiery Mill Plant a local historic landmark including the interior and exterior of the mill building and boiler house, the smokestack, and the land listed under Tax Parcel Number 08306707.

b.  To recommend that the Charlotte City Council designate the Ervin Building a local historic landmark including the interior and exterior of the building, and the land listed under Tax Parcel Numbers 13111110 and 13111114.

c.  To recommend to the Charlotte City Council that the ordinance for the Victor Shaw House be amended to de-designate all of the land associated with the historic landmark with the exception of the three lots bordering Mecklenburg Avenue, consisting of the lot that contains the historic house and the two adjacent lots lying immediately to the east and west of the historic house.  Site Plan

7.  Design Review Committee Report: Garrett Nelson  Design Review Committee Minutes

a.  McNinch House, 2401 Sharon Lane, Charlotte

Polaris Map of Property

Development Site Plan

At its April meeting, the Commission voted to approve the development plans for the McNinch House with the condition that lots 3 and 4 not be approved with the understanding that the design of lots 3 and 4 and the landscape plan would be reviewed at a later date. In accordance with this motion, the applicant has submitted architectural plans for the two houses that face Sharon Lane. 

Elevations

Marked Up Elevations

THE DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE PRESENTS A SECONDED MOTION TO THE HISTORIC LANDMARKS COMMISSION THAT LOTS THREE AND FOUR FACING SHARON LANE AND LOTS ONE AND SIX FACING THE MCNINCH HOUSE, 2401 SHARON LANE, CHARLOTTE, N.C., BE REVISED TO ADDRESS THE STREET EDGE MORE SENSITIVELY AND THAT THE SUBMITTAL OF THE LANDSCAPE PLAN BE REVIEWED BY STAFF AND THE DESIGN REVIEW CHAIRPERSON. THE COMMITTEE UNANIMOUSLY APPROVED THE MOTION.

b.  VanLandingham Estate, 2010 The Plaza, Charlotte

Polaris Map of Property

In 2015, the HLC approved a development plan for the VanLandingham Estate that included 18 townhomes and a community pool and pool house.  The development plan was never executed and no COA was issued.

The Historic District Commission has approved the presented plan. 

Current Development Plans

THE DESIGN REVIEW COMMITTEE PRESENTS A SECONDED MOTION TO THE HISTORIC LANDMARKS COMMISSION THAT IT APPROVE DEVELOPMENT PLANS AS PRESENTED FOR THE VANLANDINGHAM ESTATE, 2010 THE PLAZA, CHARLOTTE, N.C., WITH THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS: THAT THE LANDSCAPE PLAN AND PLANTING OF NATIVE SPECIES BE BLENDED INTO THE EXISTING FABRIC OF THE PROPERTY AND SUBMITTED TO STAFF FOR APPROVAL, AND THAT WALKS AND DRIVEWAYS BE EITHER LOOSE PEA GRAVEL TO MATCH EXISTING DRIVES OR EXPOSED AGGREGATE GRAVEL THAT MATCHES IN COLOR OR TEXTURE. THE COMMITTEE UNANIMOUSLY APPROVED THE MOTION.

8.  Survey Committee Report: Brian Clarke

The Survey Committee will meet on Wednesday, June 23. 

9.  Projects Committee Report: Edwin Wilson

a.  Charlotte Streetcar #85

b.  Wallace House, 9425 Robinson Church Road, Charlotte

c.  Torrence Lytle School, 302 Holbrooks Road, Huntersville

10.  Nominating Committee Report: Laura Hoover   

The Commission will vote on a slate of officers for FY 2021/2022.

Officer Nominations Slate

11.  Staff Report: Jack Thomson and Stewart Gray

Dendrochronology Project Update

12.  Old Business

13.  New Business


The next meeting of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission will be held VIRTUALLY on Monday, June 14 at 6:00 p.m. in order to maintain social distancing as directed by public health officials.

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Charlotte’s West End has factored prominently in the history of the city’s African-American community since the nineteenth century. Anchored by Johnson C. Smith University (JCSU), which was founded in 1867, the area has developed into numerous neighborhoods, including the McCrorey Heights, Oaklawn Park, Lincoln Heights, and Dalebrook communities profiled below. Additional information about these neighborhoods and other areas along the Beatties Ford Road corridor may be found at the historysouth.org website, authored by Charlotte historian Dr. Tom Hanchett. Also, the staff of JCSU’s James B. Duke Memorial Library has created an extensive website entitled “Charlotte’s Historic West End” about the historic neighborhoods and communities that surround the University, including the neighborhoods profiled here. The site offers an informative interactive map of the lower Beatties Ford Road corridor accompanied by a wealth of online resources – newspaper articles, plat maps, photographs, oral histories, and other materials – about the West End communities and historic resources that have contributed to the Queen City for more than a century.


McCrorey Heights


McCrorey Heights, located northeast of the JCSU campus, just adjacent to the I-77/I-277 exchange, started in 1912, thanks to the efforts of then JCSU president Reverend Henry L. McCrorey, who served the University in that capacity for forty years. The neighborhood grew quickly between the early 1950s and early 1970s into what historian Tom Hanchett has described as “a premier neighborhood for Charlotte’s highly educated African American elite.” Many McCrorey Heights residents participated actively in the civil rights movement, offering their support locally, regionally, and nationally. A thorough historical and architectural study of the McCrorey Heights neighborhood authored by Dr. Hanchett may be found here.  The neighborhood currently includes approximately 167 homes, many of which are mid-twentieth-century custom-designed brick ranch-style houses.


Oaklawn Park


Dating back to 1954, the Oaklawn Park neighborhood lies just north of McCrorey Heights. Oaklawn Park was designed and built by Charles Ervin, a Charlotte-based developer whose Ervin Construction Company became the nation’s seventh largest homebuilder by the 1960s. According to Dr. Hanchett, the neighborhood was constructed specifically for African-American families during the waning days of racial segregation, and is one of Charlotte’s best-preserved post-World War II suburbs. The primarily blue-collar neighborhood also counted among its residents several educators, school principals, ministers, and physicians. In part because the neighborhood, consisting primarily of brick ranch houses and split levels, remains as originally platted and built between 1954 and 1961, the Charlotte Historic District Commission has been working with residents to secure a historic district designation for Oaklawn Park. Those efforts have generated several valuable informational resources about Oaklawn Park, including an extensive property-by-property neighborhood survey and a local district designation report that incorporates a historical essay authored by Dr. Hanchett.


Lincoln Heights


In the 1920s, the Southern Realty and Development Corporation initially developed the Lincoln Heights neighborhood as a subdivision for white Charlotteans, and even attempted to lure Durham’s Duke University to relocate to Charlotte’s West End. Those efforts proved unsuccessful, leaving the neighborhood largely undeveloped until the post-World War II era. Lincoln Heights experienced significant growth in the 1950s and 1960s due in large part to the forced relocation of African-American families in the wake of the urban renewal that razed downtown’s Brooklyn neighborhood. Lincoln Heights is currently the home of Northwest School of the Arts (formerly West Charlotte High School), Lincoln Heights Neighborhood Park, and the Beatties Ford Road branch of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Public Library. A brief history of Lincoln Heights can be found here, and several related historic resources may be found under the “Lincoln Heights” entry on the interactive map available on the “Charlotte’s Historic West End” website hosted by JCSU’s James B. Duke Memorial Library.


Dalebrook


Dalebrook, another neighborhood designed and built by Charles Ervin and his Ervin Construction Company, launched in 1960 and quickly sold out within its first year. The self-contained community (located within the larger Lincoln Heights neighborhood) was the premiere neighborhood in northwest Charlotte in the early 1960s, but was specifically intended as a segregated subdivision from its inception. Dalebrook was also the boyhood community for former Charlotte Mayor and U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx. A brief history of Dalebrook can be found here, and several related historic resources may be found under the “Dalebrook” entry on the interactive map available on the “Charlotte’s Historic West End” website hosted by JCSU’s James B. Duke Memorial Library.


CELEBRATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION

Lunch & Learn: The Sloan-Porter House

Thursday, May 27 at 12:00PM

Zoom – Free

Celebrate Preservation Month and learn about one of few remaining 18th century homes in Charlotte – The Sloan-Porter House. Homeowners and preservation-enthusiasts Brian and Sarah Clarke will discuss the trials and successes of restoring the c. 1790 Sloan-Porter House, largely on their own. Guest host Kristi Harpst, Program Manager at Historic Districts for the City of Charlotte and member of the Museum’s Preservation Committee, will interview the Clarkes and share resources for homeowners.