Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmarks Commission

Author: Elizabeth Stuart

Draft Agenda
January 29, 2020 – 8:00 a.m.

1.  Chair’s Report: Garrett Nelson

2.  Director’s Report: Jack Thomson

3.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

4.  Frank R. McNinch House, 2401 Sharon Lane, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

The applicant is seeking approval of an infill development plan.

McNinch House

McNinch House

5.  Blakeney House, 9118 Blakeney Heath Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

The applicant is seeking approval of an infill development plan.

Blakeney House

Blakeney Land

6.  Hennigan Place, 3603 Tilley Morris Road, Matthews, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

The applicant is proposing modifications to the house’s existing historic stone foundation.

Hennigan Place

Hennigan Place

Hennigan Place

7.  Old Business

8.  New Business


The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation is defined as the act or process of making possible a compatible use for a property through repair, alterations, and additions while preserving those portions or features which convey its historical, cultural, or architectural values.

1. A property will be used as it was historically or be given a new use that requires minimal change to its distinctive materials, features, spaces and spatial relationships.

2. The historic character of a property will be retained and preserved. The removal of distinctive materials or alteration of features, spaces and spatial relationships that characterize a property will be avoided.

3. Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or elements from other historic properties, will not be undertaken.

4. Changes to a property that have acquired historic significance in their own right will be retained and preserved.

5. Distinctive materials, features, finishes and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property will be preserved.

6. Deteriorated historic features will be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature will match the old in design, color, texture and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features will be substantiated by documentary and physical evidence.

7. Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.

8. Archaeological resources will be protected and preserved in place. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken.

9. New additions, exterior alterations or related new construction will not destroy historic materials, features and spatial relationships that characterize the property. The new work will be differentiated from the old and will be compatible with the historic materials, features, size, scale and proportion, and massing to protect the integrity of the property and its environment.

10. New additions and adjacent or related new construction will be undertaken in such a manner that, if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.


January 17, 2020

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, giving some women the right to vote. To celebrate this anniversary, the National Trust for Historic Preservation is requesting help from the public. See below for more information on the National Trust and how you can help the organization with its celebration.


The National Trust is a private, nonprofit membership organization that works to save America’s historic places. As the United States approaches the 2020 celebration of the 19th Amendment, “Where Women Made History” aims to uncover and uplift the stories of female trailblazers whose vision, passion, and determination over the centuries have shaped us into the nation we are today. To that end, the National Trust is engaging the general public in crowdsourcing lesser-known sites where this important history took place. Participants are invited to submit a story and picture of a place connected to women’s history that matters to them. The goal: discover 1,000 places connected to women’s history, and elevate their stories for everyone to learn and celebrate.

This year, as the United States celebrates the 100th anniversary of some women earning the right to vote, we at the National Trust want to tell the full history—to uncover and uplift women across the centuries whose vision, passion, and determination have shaped the country we are today. Our goal: discover 1,000 places connected to women’s history, and elevate their stories for everyone to learn and celebrate.

But to do this, we need your help. What places have you encountered where women made history? They can be famous or unknown, protected or threatened, existing or lost. No matter their condition or status, these places matter, and we encourage you to share them with the world.

Have a place you’d like to share? Submit a photo and a short description at https://savingplaces.org/where-women-made-history. Thank you for helping us tell the full American story!


January 22, 2020 – 6:00 p.m.

1.  Chair’s Report: Len Norman

2.  Director’s Report: Jack Thomson

3.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

4.  Update on the Beatties Ford Road Corridor Study

Beatties Ford Road Survey Spreadsheet

Washington Heights Survey Spreadsheet

5.  The Kimberlee, 1300 Reece Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Presentation on Property

Additional Photographs of Property

A group of the owners in the building’s co-op is interested in preservation options for the historic building.

The Kimberlee

6.  Arthur Samuel Grier House, 421 Montrose Street, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Survey and Research Report

The Committee will consider updating the designation report for this property. 

Arthur Samuel Grier House

7.  Consideration of Funding for Survey and Research Reports

a.  Huntersville Rosenwald School, 508 Dellwood Drive, Huntersville, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

Information on Property

Huntersville Rosenwald School

b.  Ca. 1936 YMCA Building, 416 E. 3rd Street, Charlotte, N.C.

Polaris Map of Property

YMCA Building

8.  Charlotte Modernist Survey

The Committee will consider whether to contact all owners of the short list of important properties to gauge their interest in historic landmark designation. 

9.  Consideration of Potential Historic Resources in Druid Hills 

Map of the Druid Hills Neighborhood

2115 Edison Street

2120 Edison Street

10.  Update on Mecklenburg County GIS

11.  Old Business

12.  New Business


1.  Consideration of Minutes  Click Here for December 9th Minutes

a.  Consideration of Closed Session Minutes

2.  Chair’s Report: Jeff Parsons

3.  Treasurer’s Report: Diane Althouse  January 2020 Project Budget Report

4.  Senior Preservation Planner’s Report: Stewart Gray

a.  Attendance and Phone Policy  HLC Attendance Tracking

b.  Update on the McNinch House, 2401 Sharon Lane, Charlotte, N.C.

c.  Update on the Beatties Ford Road Corridor Study

5.  Design Review Committee Report: Garrett Nelson

The Design Review Committee will meet on Wednesday, January 29.

6.  Survey Committee Report: Len Norman

The Survey Committee will meet on Wednesday, January 22. 

7.  Projects Committee Report: Edwin Wilson  Click Here for Projects Committee Minutes

a. Arthur Samuel Grier House, 421 Montrose Street, Charlotte, N.C. 

Map of Property

Arthur Samuel Grier House

THE PROJECTS COMMITTEE PRESENTS A SECONDED MOTION TO THE HISTORIC LANDMARKS COMMISSION THAT IT AUTHORIZE THE HLC EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TO CONTACT THE PROPERTY OWNERS OF THE ARTHUR SAMUEL GRIER HOUSE, 421 MONTROSE STREET, CHARLOTTE, N.C., WITH THE INTENT OF PURSUING PURCHASE OPTIONS AND DETERMINING OWNER ATTITUDE OF HISTORIC LANDMARK DESIGNATION OF THE PROPERTY. 

8.  Director’s Report: Jack Thomson

a.  Update on the Excelsior Club, 921 Beatties Ford Road, Charlotte, N.C. 

b.  Update on Torrence Lytle School Purchase and Preservation Agreements

9.  Old Business

10.  New Business


January 6, 2020 – 6:00 p.m.

1.  Chair’s Report and Welcome: Edwin Wilson

2.  Update on Projects

a.  Torrence Lytle School, 302 Holbrooks Road, Huntersville, N.C.

Map of Property

Torrence Lytle School

b.  Wallace House, 9425 Robinson Church Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Map of Property

Wallace House

c.  White Oak, 7729 Hood Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Map of Property

White Oak

d.  Mayes House, 435 E. Morehead Street, Charlotte, N.C.

Map of Property

John Mayes House

e.  Former Mount Carmel Baptist Church, 412 Campus Street, Charlotte, N.C.

Map of Property

Former Mount Carmel Baptist Church

f.  Excelsior Club, 921 Beatties Ford Road, Charlotte, N.C.

Map of Property

Excelsior Club

g.  James C. Dowd House, 2216 Monument Street, Charlotte, N.C., and Former Charlotte Fire Station #10, 2136 Remount Road, Charlotte, N.C. 

Map of Property

James C. Dowd House

Former Charlotte Fire Station #10

h.  Douglas House, 7601 Christie Lane, Charlotte, N.C.

Map of Property

John Douglas House

i.  Grier House, 421 Montrose Street, Charlotte, N.C.

Map of Property

Arthur Samuel Grier House

3.  Organizational

a.  Projects Committee Charter/Mission

b.  2020 HLC Strategic Plan Initiative

4.  Old Business

5.  New Business